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30 Second Reviews: Weekly Round Up

Elizabeth Donald: Easier to Apologize This song has quite the pedigree: written by Hillary Lindsey and produced by John McBride, Dan Huff, David Huff, and Dan Dugmore, Donald recorded it at the famed Blackbird Studios in Nashville and has earned the approved of the legendary David Foster with her soulful voice and rich melodies. Donald’s newest single is the perfect “calm after the storm” anthem of “forgive and forget” in every day life and love. It is charming in its simplicity, but honest in its storytelling – something we often see lacking these days in our cutoff shorts and booze in the back of the truck bro-country anthems that dominate the airwaves.  The likelihood that this will play on the radio is slim to none, but I hope it will, at the very least, dominate playlists and streams and gain critical acclaim as this newcomer rises in the ranks. Check out Donald’s Easier to Apologize here.

Mickey Guyton: Sister When I first heard this song I thought it was Carrie Underwood! Guyton has a fantastic voice and an unapologetic pop flair. This is not my favorite sub genre, but the lyrics are so sweetly optimistic and empowering I can’t help but love this song. Guyton has taken a positive stance for women everywhere by celebrating the relationships we have, whether it is with our biological sisters or those of our heart, and I think it’s fantastic. I cannot understand why this woman is not a knockout on the radio. She’s got the perfect mix of pop melodies and power vocals to compete with every other female artist every major label is pushing right now. I can’t wait to see Mickey Guyton explode. We are way past due on that happening. Way. Past. due. Check out Guyton’s Sister here.

The Highwomen Redesigning Women I love every single thing about The Highwomen and their new single. These four particular women doing this particular thing, writing this particular song; it’s perfect. First things first; anyone who wants to say that Maren Morris isn’t a country singer can go ahead and sit down. Maren Morris is a perfect example of an artist expressing her artistic freedom. That woman can sing whatever she wants whenever she wants. You may not like it. In fact, I don’t like a lot of what she sings, but that’s the POINT of making art. She is fearless and she is fierce and she is not apologizing. Brandi Carlile is experiencing a breathtaking renaissance in her career, and Amanda Shires and Natalie Hemby are brilliant. Their song, simple but powerful in its lyrics, is a timeless explanation of the experiences of women that will no doubt be celebrated in country music as the years pass. I find this song reminiscent of Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette which, I suspect, is not far off from their intent. Watch the new video here.

Miranda Lambert It All Comes Out In The Wash Ahhhh, the irreverence of Miranda. This single is by no means groundbreaking for Lambert; it sounds like the last ten songs she’s released. Nevertheless, it’s a great song. The writing is clever, the production is top notch, and we can’t wait for the rest of the album.¬†Lambert has a unique talent for making one feel everything and nothing all at once. She’s the queen of blas√©, I don’t give a damn, except I dogive a damn, honky tonk songs. Co-written with Lori McKenna, Liz Rose, and Hillary Lindsey, the biggest question swirling around this single debut was whether it would see radio play. Lambert’s last two singles, “Keeper of the Flame” and “Tin Man” were met with lukewarm response (despite being brilliant songs) and only made it to #22 and #55 on the charts respectively. “It All Comes Out in the Wash” has been met differently, however, reporting 108 first week station adds and debuting at #19 on Billboard’s Country airplay chart. In short, Lambert is back and better than ever. To hear Lambert’s newest single, click here.

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